SWOT #1 – Vulnerable Confidence

When we show Vulnerable Confidence we share ourselves without hesitation, comfortable whether we are accepted or not, committed to accepting others whether we are accepted or not.  If we are afraid to show the depth of our personality and/or our emotional core, we deny the scene, our fellow players and the audience the power inherent our Details, our Reactions and our Selves.

Vulnerable Confidence

If this Weakness is identified, the following posts may prove helpful in coaching to the Opportunity:
* Get confident, stupid
* Confident acceptance
* Cafe Scenes
* I Am Superman
* Here’s What I Know
* The Path to Unconscious Competence

SWOT #18 – Confident Vulnerability

Don’t let becoming a good improviser keep you from becoming a great improviser.  Believing in your ability is good; being open to your weakness in committing to constant betterment is great.  Finding a personal understanding of what works for you on stage is good; staying receptive to the ideas of even the greenest improviser is great.

Confidence is not bulletproof.  Confidence is not brash, is not loud, is not immovable.  Confidence is a personal calm.

Vulnerability is not weakness.  Vulnerability is not meek, is not afraid to speak, is not constantly acquiescing.  Vulnerability is accessibility.

Practice makes perfect it’s said.  Through experience in improv a player grows to bring calm into the chaos and remain open to the moment’s possibilities.  The greatest players exude this accessible calm; they expose themselves on stage without fear.  It makes the audience root for them before they’ve said a word. Seek to emulate the classic Dead Head: Accepting who they are without shame and accepting who you are without judgment.

Yes, with practice confident vulnerability will come.  It also doesn’t hurt to practice confident vulnerability until what you fake you feel.

Confident Vulnerability

If this Weakness is identified, the following posts may prove helpful in coaching to the Opportunity:
* Get confident, stupid
* The Path to Unconscious Competence

“Here’s What I Know” self channeling exercise

HERE’S WHAT I KNOW – One player takes the stage with everyone else in the audience. Audience, with teacher moderating, asks the player very technical or nonsensical or just hard questions. The player presents him/herself as an expert in all areas and is therefore able to confidently respond to all questions.
Lessons:
• Emotions are always trump – A maniacal laugh. A dismissive ‘pshaw.’ Even an awkward misdirection. All of these non-informative but emotional responses keep a player in control.
Decisiveness is king – struggling to the right answer is rarely as satisfying as quickly deciding on any answer.
Commitment is all the sense you need – players can get hung up on thinking through responses that “make sense.” Forget sense. Just make a choice and stand by it confidently. Commitment to making a decision despite sense will make your response sound “right” even if it isn’t and/or it’ll focus the scene on your “wrong” character instead of the Q&A “stuff,” which is awesome.
Committed, You Can Stand By Yourself – you can be on stage alone for 30 seconds or for five minutes. Commit to yourself. Don’t rely on meeting your scene partner center stage before the scene starts. You can be alone.

I Am Superman self channeling exercise

I AM SUPERMAN – Everyone stands in a circle. One at a time, each player will enter the circle, say “I am [NAME] and for the next 30 seconds, I am Superman” at which point the teacher will start a timer and the player does whatever they want until the time is up at which point everyone claps and the next player takes the circle. Players around the circle are NOT to interact with the player in the center. The player in the center should be encouraged to do something they’ve been told they need to do more of on stage. Do mime. Be emotional. Stand still. Doesn’t matter.
Lessons:
• Surrender to your group – let go of ego, let your team know that you’re ready and willing to commit to being awkward in front of them.
• It sucks to be alone – don’t let your fellow players suffer on stage alone. Get out there and support each other.

I Am Superman exercise

Having Group Mind is about immediate, enthusiastic acceptance. You need to show your fellow players that you respect and love their ideas, and trust that you can make a bold move and have your group respect and love it. “I trust you – I’m going to follow your ideas whatever they are, wherever they go, and I’m going to launch into my ideas and trust that you’ll follow me.” It is, however, not up to the group to earn this trust. You must surrender to the group. Give it your trust. Only then will the group get anywhere.

I AM SUPERMAN – Everyone stands in a circle. One at a time, each player will enter the circle, say “I am [NAME] and for the next 30 seconds, I am Superman” at which point the teacher will start a timer and the player does whatever they want until the time is up at which point everyone claps and the next player takes the circle. Players around the circle are NOT to interact with the player in the center. The player in the center should be encouraged to do something they’ve been told they need to do more of on stage. Do mime. Be emotional. Stand still. Doesn’t matter.
Lessons:
• Surrender to your group – let go of ego, let your team know that you’re ready and willing to commit to being awkward in front of them.
You don’t need anyone – you can be on stage alone for 30 seconds or for five minutes. Commit to yourself. Don’t rely on meeting your scene partner center stage before the scene starts. You can be alone.
It sucks to be alone – don’t let your fellow players suffer on stage alone. Get out there and support each other.